What Is A Jaw Surgery Splint?

What is a jaw surgical splint and how does it work? What are the benefits of having a splint put in after surgery and how much does it cost? If you want to learn more about jaw surgical splints before you go in for jaw surgery or you’re just curious, then continue to read on.

What Is Jaw Surgical Splints

It is a template that is made from plastic. It is made from dental models from the new bite. The splint is small, but it isn’t always used during surgery. However, the chances are that the surgeon will place one into the new bite during your jaw surgery.

How Does Splints Work

The way it works is simple, it’s designed to keep the jaw in the proper position. The surgeon will divide your jaws during the procedure, and then they will wire your teeth together, and the wire goes into the splint. Although it is plastic, you will not be able to see it because it is clear plastic. Once it has been set in place, it will stay there until the surgeon unwires the jaw.

When you go back to the surgeon, they will let you know if it’s time unwire your jaw. You might have to go for a few follow-ups before this procedure is done. Different patients require different lengths of time before their jaws are unwired.

The Benefits

It plays a major role in the success of the surgery, because it holds the wires together. If a splint wasn’t used, then the wires may very well come apart, and they would need to be put together again. In short, they are crucial elements of jaw surgery. If you want to learn all of the benefits, then speak to your surgeon.

Jaw Surgical Splints Cost

Generally speaking, you do not pay any additional costs when you have a splint installed. It is usually included in the overall price you’re paying for the jaw surgery. Sometimes one is used, and sometimes it’s not, but your surgeon will inform you whether or not a splint will be used or if there’s a possibility that one will be used.

Potential Side Effects

There’s really not many potential side effects associated with the splint. There is a small chance that the splint won’t be installed properly and this might lead to complications. However, if you choose a highly skilled surgeon to perform your jaw surgery, then the chances are very small that you’ll experience any issues with the splint or the surgery for that matter. If you do think there is an issue after your surgery, then make sure you contact the surgeon as soon as possible and inform them of the issues.

Those are the potential side effects of a jaw surgical splint, and now you know more about how it works and what it is exactly. You also know more about costs and the benefits of splints. If you have any more questions about their uses, then make sure you ask the surgeon who will be performing your surgery.

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How To Handle Jaw Surgery Infection

If you have an infection after jaw surgery, the first thing you’re going to want to do is to contact your doctor. This type of situation is an unfortunate possibility after oral surgery. Nevertheless, oral operations are sometimes required, particularly when it comes to the difficult removal of embedded wisdom teeth.

What did you have oral or jaw surgery for? In this case, you have come down with an infection. Now, there are other tips that I need to tell you, and there are also tips you need to know how to help prevent infection. If, and in this case it did, an infection does occur, that doesn’t mean you did anything wrong. Things happen, and now let’s get down to some helpful tips.

First, the reason why you want to go to the doctor is that infections have to be treated medically for them to get better. You don’t want an infection to get worse. That being said, the ironic thing about infections is they often have to be treated orally. In this case, you have just had oral surgery, hence the irony.

Not all infections have to be treated orally, but we’re also talking about an infection that has set in after a surgical procedure. To be safe either way, you’re going to want to consult your doctor. After any medications have been prescribed, you want to focus on recovery.

You will want to of course get plenty of rest. You are going to want to make sure that you also protect the area where the operation was performed. You are going to have to stick to soft foods for a while, too. Directions to follow will be provided by your doctor. Just to give you an idea, the soft foods diet is typically for a week after oral surgery and on a baseline level. That means that usually after a week, your diet can be modified.

That, of course, doesn’t mean you’re going to move straight from eating mashed potatoes or ice cream right to a ribeye. Another thing you want to do is stay hydrated. You’re going to want to drink plenty of the right liquids in order to recover properly. Additionally, you need to know that for a period of 24 hours, you’re going to want to stay away from caffeine, hot beverages and anything carbonated.

You also are going to need to make sure you don’t use tobacco products or have any alcohol. You might want to use a cold compress as well. At the same time, you might be prescribed pain meds, and you want to be sure that you practice the best oral hygiene. It takes time to recover from a jaw operationor any other type of oral surgery. Take it one step and one day at a time. You are going to be just fine. You had to deal with an infection, but it happens, and the doctor is going to take good care of you.

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Importance Of Doing Mouth Exercises After Jaw Surgery

Jaw surgery can involve an intensive rehabilitation process. Because of this, you want to be certain that you are doing the correct mouth exercises on a daily basis to improve your recovery efforts.

In this article, we will be going over some of the different reasons why doing the proper mouth exercises after jaw surgery is so important.

1. Healing.

One of the main reasons you are going to want to incorporate the right jaw exercises in your routine is to improve the healing efforts. The more you provide your jaw with enhanced circulation, the better your jaw is going to heal.

2. Mobility.

Another big thing that you are going to want to do jaw exercises for when you are recovering from jaw surgery would be to improve the mobility of your jaw entirely. You want to continue to focus on improving the overall mobility of your jaw because it is going to keep your jaw from getting stiff.

It’s imperative to keep the normal mobility and range of motion for your jaw because it can keep your jaw healing properly and really functioning as it should. A lack of motion can result in stiff joints and muscles.

3. Stiffness.

The fact is, stiffness is one of the most common symptoms that you are likely to experience after you get jaw surgery. After all, you are going to have significant swelling in your jaw area. Therefore, your jaw is likely to feel very stiff. By incorporating gentle exercises into your recuperation process, you should be able to alleviate some of the stiffness.

4. Rubber Bands.

The rubber bands that you are going to be using is very common for recovering from jaw surgery. These rubber bands are typically used to guide the jaw with the right placement. You want to focus on using the rubber bands as often as you are supposed to for optimal recovery efforts.

5. Ask Questions.

When you are looking to recover from jaw surgery, you are going to want to be sure that you are asking any and all questions that you might have. Asking the questions that you want answers to is going to put you in the best possible position to get the kind of care you need and to ensure that your recovery process goes as smoothly as possible.

You should be asking various questions to optimize your recovery process. They will be able to tell you what you should be doing and what you should be avoiding doing which can help your recovery process.

Along with this, they will be able to tell you what to expect throughout the process so you are able to identify issues and potential problems to determine if they are complications with your recovery.

Final Note On Recovering From Jaw Surgery

Overall, there are plenty of different reasons you are going to want to incorporate exercises into your recuperation process when you are recovering from jaw surgery. You want to focus on implementing the right exercises in your routine to really achieve the kind of results that you are looking for. By following the tips above, you should be able to do just that. However, it is important to not only ask for, but also follow a strict guide that you should be using for your recovery from your doctor. By getting step by step instructions from your doctor, you should be able to implement a recovery process that gets you back to normal as soon as possible. They will be able to tell you specific recommendations for your personalized recovery to optimize the entire process.

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Jaw Surgery Recovery FAQs and Answers

When undergoing jaw surgery, a lot of patients wonder how long it will take to heal after surgery and what they should expect during recovery. It is natural to be curious about how long you will need to be away from school or work, how long it will be before you are back on your feet, and the level of discomfort you will experience during recovery before you can feel like yourself again.

For the better part, predicting healing and recovery times after jaw surgery will be determined on a case by cases basis, and varies from patient to patient. With that being said, here are several general answers to the most commonly asked questions a lot of patients ask about recovery after corrective jaw surgery. 

How Long Should I Expect To Be In Hospital?

The amount of time you spend in the hospital will depend on the type of surgery you undergo, how well you can tolerate pain, and how quickly you heal. Once you are no longer in need of on-demand pain relief, you should be fit to get discharged from the hospital. This is usually after two to three days for adults, and overnight for teens.

How Painful is the Procedure?

As unbelievable as this may sound, the truth is, jaw surgery is not that painful, so you don’t have to worry about experiencing excruciating pain. Some people will feel some level of discomfort because of the jaw’s new positioning, but it won’t be that painful.

Before surgery, your doctor will give you a prescription of all the medications you’ll need throughout post-surgery recovery. It is advisable that you have your prescription filled before undergoing surgery so that all the medicine you need is ready for once you return home. The prescribed medication will help control swelling and minimize discomfort.

Apart from the swelling and minor pain following your jaw surgery, which will be controlled by the medication given, your nerves will also be slightly bruised, meaning they’ll feel little to no pain at all. By the time they return to normal, the jaw’s healing process will already be well underway, and all discomforts will have gone away.

Will I Swell? And If So, How Long Will It Last? 

Once you get back home, you’ll likely experience some swelling for the first two weeks after surgery. In some people, slight swelling will remain for a couple of months until their jaw heals completely.

How Long Does It Take For The Jaw To Heal After Surgery?

It’ll take about Three months for your jaw to heal completely.

Will I Be Able To Eat Anything I Like After Jaw Surgery?

Immediately after surgery, you’ll be limited to a 100% dairy-free liquid diet. For the first ten days, your menu will be restricted to homemade fruit smoothies, and dairy-free protein shakes only. For most people, smoothies will need to be administered via a syringe as chewing won’t be allowed during the first days of the healing period.

Your surgeon will inform you of when it is alright for you to start chewing again. Once you have been given the green light, you will only be able to eat soft foods like mashed potatoes and pasta as your jaws aren’t strong enough yet. However, it is worth noting that it will take some time before you can return to your normal diet. The progress you make in this area will depend on how fast your body heals.

There are also a couple of things that we would advise you to pay close attention to after surgery. It is vital that you stay well hydrated after your surgery, so make sure that you are drinking plenty of water. At the same time, make sure that you’re ingesting adequate amounts of fiber during recovery. Both fiber and hydration intake are vital in ensuring that your digestive system runs smoothly.

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How To Cure Tooth Infection Without Root Canal


You have a few options to turn to if you have been found to be in need of a root canal procedure. Are there any alternatives to a root canal? Below we will determine whether you need to undergo a root canal treatment or not; common root canal side effects; and a look at any available natural alternatives you can pursue.

In the US, more than 30 million root canal procedures are performed annually. Most of these are actually not necessary. As such, it’s best to seek a second opinion from a dentist who usually prefers to conserve teeth, immediately after your primary dentist prescribes a root canal.

You have the opportunity to consult another dentist or a couple more, in search of a second opinion if your tooth is not causing you pain.

In most cases, only crowns or high quality fillings are needed for teeth that are initially diagnosed to be in need of a root canal. There are numerous and varied reasons why your dentist fails to offer worthwhile root canal alternatives such as crowns and fillings. 

To begin with, they might not be trained on how to use the most recent composite materials required in these procedures. The alternative procedures may not be as profitable as root canal. Or it might simply be that your dentist has a negative energy. To learn your surgical options, you will need to see another dentist for a second opinion.

When Do You Need To Undergo A Root Canal?

You might be a prime candidate for a root canal if you are experiencing severe pain in addition to a tooth infection that just doesn’t seem to clear up. You might not need to have a root canal if there are no signs of an infection and you are not experiencing any pain.

To determine if the tooth in question is infected, use this resource. You can find out what various types of tooth pain mean by using the list of symptoms to narrow things down. Tooth infections are characterized by the presence of pus filled areas in the gums and swelling that affects more than just the gum. A gum infection on the other hand may be indicated by gum swelling without any pus present.

All tooth swelling and pain is not solely caused by an infection in the root of the tooth. Abscessed gum tissue may also develop swelling. These infections in the gum tissue do not need a root canal to be cured.
 
Root Canal Side Effects

Through their research, Dentists George Meinig and Weston Price showed that the large central nerve-canal space in the center of the tooth is not all you have to worry about. Radiating throughout the tooth body, there are millions of tiny canals branching off the central nerve canal space. Toxins originating from the nerve canal space can hide within the miles of tunnels making up these tiny tubules.

The electron microscope backed this up. The cleaning action of the tooth lymph fluid and the tooth nerve may be cut-off from these parts of the tooth. The tubules may start to release toxic matter, via microscopic channels in the tooth or between the inner root canal’s gutta percha material and the tooth’s inner layer, into the body, because they act as tiny fermentation compartments. 

Not all root canals lead to the release of toxic and infectious matter into the body. However, most root canals turn out to be toxic when tested.

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Different Kinds Of Oral Surgery

There are numerous conditions where oral surgery is warranted.  Although no one looks forward to having surgery, at times it is the only way to ensure optimal oral health.  Before your oral surgery is done, you will be given a detailed treatment plan by your dentist. The dentist will go over anesthesia options with you to make sure you don’t feel any discomfort during the procedure or at least as little as possible.  

After the surgery has been performed, you will need to go through a recovery period.  Many of the procedures require painkillers to be taken following the surgery so that any recovery-related lingering pain can be alleviated.  So do not plan to drive yourself after your oral surgery procedure.  

Oral Surgery For Placing Dental Implants 

With every passing day, dental implant surgery becomes increasingly popular. The procedure involves the teeth being replaced with surgically implanted metal posts.  The post directly connects to the jaw bone via the osseointegration process.  

The connection provides a sturdy foundation on which the crowns and abutments are placed in order to resemble real teeth.  After your dental implants have been placed, it will be hard for people to tell that you are wearing artificial teeth.  It is the ideal surgery option for people who have lost multiple teeth. 

Impacted Wisdom Teeth

Third molars, or wisdom teeth, are the last teeth to form fully inside of the mouth.  These teeth in many cases don’t erupt completely or they end up having alignment issues.  Those issues cause the gums, bone, and jaw to impact the teeth, which then affects the nearby teeth’s health as well.  

Tooth Extraction 

The most common type of oral surgery is extracting teeth.  Some teeth cannot be saved through a root canal or other type of dental procedure.  If the tooth is decaying and the nerve inside of the tooth is dead, then your dentist will discuss the tooth extraction method with you and go over the various replacement options. 

Oral Surgery For Jaw Issues 

It has been proven that oral surgeries are successful for a wide range of jaw-related diseases and injuries. For example, unequal jaw growth can be remedied by oral surgery. Surgery can position all or part of the lower or upper jaw or both to enhance balance, health and functionality. If unusual growth within the jaw is ignored, it may lead to issues with breathing, eating, and swallowing.  In jaw growth failure instances, oral surgery may be the only solution that is viable.      

Biopsy 

Oral surgery is frequently performed for a biopsy to determine if there is cancer or not.  When a dentist is concerned about a tumor, she or he most likely recommend a biopsy.  Part of the tissue is removed in this procedure  Tissue samples then are tested.  Oral surgery is necessary as well in order to combat certain lesions that are not eliminated by medication.

Conclusion

No matter what your specific condition is, there are different approaches that a dentist will take. Knowing what these procedures involve before you meet your dentist will help you prepare some questions so you know exactly what to expect.

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Get your Questions In and I’ll Video Answer Them

Hi all!

Hope everyone’s doing well wherever you are in the jaw surgery process, whether it’s just deciding to begin, pre-surgery or recovering after surgery.

I’d like to try out a new feature where I would answer your questions in video format. Depending on how this first one goes, I could do them once a week or once or month.

All you have to do is post your number one question in the comments below, and I’ll try and include it, along with my answer, in the first video.

So, if you could only ask ONE question about jaw surgery, what would YOURS be?

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Wisdom Teeth Surgery – Preparing For Corrective Jaw Surgery

Wisdom Teeth Surgery

Wisdom Teeth Surgery

Before getting any kind of corrective jaw surgery, most people have to undergo wisdom teeth surgery first.

In most cases, wisdom teeth need to be removed anyway, so you may have already had this done.

If not, the surgeon and orthodontist not only need the extra room for hooks and devices, but if your wisdom teeth are still coming in, they could cause crowding or movement that interferes with the rest of the process.

While I’ve heard a few cases of patients getting their wisdom teeth out at the same time as their actual facial reconstructive surgery, most people, including myself, get them taken out a few months before the jaw surgery.

You need at least a few months for your mouth to fully heal before your surgeon can perform the main operation.

I loved the fact that my maxillofacial surgeon was the same one that performed my wisdom teeth surgery, so it was kind of like a trial run for me, especially since I had never been put under before.

The surgery went great and gave me even more confidence in my orthognathic surgeon.

What To Expect With Wisdom Teeth Surgery

The morning of the surgery, my Dad drove me to the surgeon’s office. You will definitely need a ride to and from, because even if you aren’t put fully under, you will probably at least have some type of laughing gas, and you will be out of it afterward.

For my first time being put under, it was pretty uneventful. He told me to count backward from 10, and I don’t even remember getting past 9, then I woke up and it was over.

I was definitely a little out of it, but I felt fine. My cheeks were very swollen for the first week or two, and it’s important not to use a straw during that initial period either, or you risk infection of the sockets where your wisdom teeth used to be.

I followed the instructions and stayed away from straws, but my cousin didn’t and said infected sockets are a very uncomfortable and painful hassle, so please follow your surgeon’s instructions.

Once your wisdom teeth are history, your orthodontist will continue to tweak things with your braces, while you heal up.

The wisdom teeth surgery itself wasn’t a big deal at all, and other than being a little sore and swollen for a week or two, it’s a small bump in the road on the path to your new smile and bite!

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Corrective Jaw Surgery – Where Should You Begin?

Corrective Jaw Surgery

Corrective Jaw Surgery

One of the first questions I get on a daily basis about corrective jaw surgery is, “Where do I begin?”

This comes from everyone who already knows they need surgery to someone who just wants to see what their options are and where to start.

The first thing I ask back is whether or not you already have an orthodontist.

If so, that’s where you should start, and there’s two reasons for this.

One, depending on your situation, you may be able to correct your bite with just braces, forgoing the surgery all together. While the surgery isn’t quite as scary as some make it out to be, it’s certainly no walk in the park and would be great if you can truly correct your issue without it.

Also, even if your orthodontist has already suggested surgery, they often know and work with experienced surgeons in your area, so they can give you a referral to set up a consultation.

In every orthognathic case, the orthodontist and surgeon have to work closely together in making sure that each does their job in getting you ready for a successful surgery.

The orthodontist’s job is, surprisingly, to make your bite worse. Huh?! Yeah, but there’s a method to the madness, because the ortho positions your teeth for your new post-surgery bite, so your current bite may get even more out of whack.

Don’t worry though, because the changes are so gradual, you will barely notice until it’s time for surgery anyway.

If you don’t already have an orthodontist, then that’s where you need to start.

Call around, ask some of your metal-mouthed friends, check online, or do whatever you can to find an orthodontist that you are comfortable with and can trust.

Don’t be afraid to go into a few different offices to meet and consult with various doctors, because this guy or gal is going to have their hands in your mouth for the next couple of years.

Once you sit down and discuss your options with your orthodontist, it’s time to set up the consultation with the orthognathic maxillofacial surgeon (sounds scary, right?).

During this initial consultation, come armed with every question you can think of, because this is the first true step in starting the process.

He will assess your overall bite and jaw alignment, and the office may even take new X-rays and molds. He may even be able to tell you if you’re due for underbite surgery, overbite surgery, or both, but don’t be surprised if a final determination isn’t made right away.

Some of the consultations are complimentary, especially if you’re going to go ahead with the surgery, and some charge a fee for the service.

Either way, it is absolutely worth the time and money to meet and consult with as many surgeons as you have to, until you feel completely comfortable and confident in the man or woman that’s going to be breaking your skull and bolting it back together.

Corrective jaw surgery was absolutely 100% worth it for me, but there’s no doubt that it’s a long and complex process, so having a surgeon that is willing to talk to you and answer any questions you have truthfully and honestly is essential to a great experience.

Corrective Jaw Surgery – Where to Begin Podcast

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Corrective Jaw Surgery Video – Best explanation I’ve seen yet

This video is an excellent visual demonstration of corrective jaw surgery, specifically upper and lower, which is what I had.

Don’t worry, it’s a digital rendering, so there’s nothing gruesome, but it’s amazing to actually see exactly what happens, where the surgeons cut, how they put it back together, and everything, all in about 60 seconds.

Check it out, and let me know if it was as eye-opening for you as it was for me:

They have a few other videos on YouTube too, if you want to browse around on their channel, but this one really stood out, so I wanted to highlight it here.

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